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PE Curriculum

PE Curriculum

 

Sport is an important aspect of life at Rimrose Hope. We encourage the children to join in and provide them with a range of learning experiences to enrich their cultural, physical, mental and spiritual development, so that they become confident and positive individuals, who take responsibility for their own healthy choices and lifestyle. PE is a significant subject within Rimrose Hope and offers teachers powerful connections for other curriculum areas, from learning through “play”, an essential form of learning in our early years to the confidence that comes from a strong healthy body and mind in later years. It has positive physical and mental impact on the child and teachers are mindful of the importance of engaging children early in individual and team based sport activities.

What does PE look like in the foundation stage?

At this stage, the aim of PE is to improve skills of coordination, control, manipulation and movement, much of it taking place through free or lightly structured activity. So a child may dance while listening to a story, music CD or action rhyme.

Your child will develop large motor skills through jumping, hopping, skipping, climbing and running, and also through playing with pedal and push-and-pull toys. Your child will participate freely in these kinds of activities both indoors and outdoors.

Fine motor skills may be acquired by filling a container with sand, doing a puzzle or stringing beads. Your child needs these skills to do up buttons or laces and to hold a pen or pencil to write correctly. Children who practise and succeed in filling containers in the water tray will handle drinks more successfully and have the confidence to, for example, pour out their own drinks.

There are some language objectives in PE lessons, too. The teacher may introduce words for negotiation and co-operation, such as ‘share’, ‘wait’, ‘take turns’, ‘before‘ and  ‘after’.

Why are we so passionate about getting young children involved in sport at a young age?

The benefit of Physical Education for young children is well documented, not only for the health benefits that it gives children physically but also for their mental health. The younger those children can become involved in physical activity, the more likely they will be to adopt a love of sport and fitness as they grow up.

Employ these tactics at home to add to your child’s school learning:

  • Walk to nursery or school, and go for walks in the park.
  • Encourage active and rough and tumble play in the garden, indoors or at adventure parks.
  • Teach your child to ride a bike and to balance on a scooter.
  • Aim for at least an hour of moderate activity every day. Plus encourage activities that enhance and maintain muscular strength, flexibility and bone health twice a week, such as climbing, skipping, jumping or gymnastics.
  • Encourage your child to eat their five a day in a variety of fruits, vegetables and colours.
  • Talk to your child about the importance of eating healthily and keeping active.

 

What does P.E look like in Key Stage 1?

The main emphasis at Key Stage 1 PE is on the physical development of basic motor skills. Children learn to control objects, apparatus and themselves physically in a variety of situations. They experience progressively more difficult tasks and attempt an increasing range of activities.

Your child will have opportunities to create, refine and perform travelling movements, rotation and balances on gymnastics apparatus. Gymnastics and dance allow possibilities for children to express themselves creatively, too. Your child will also develop key skills, such as throwing and catching which provide numerous opportunities to practise important motor skills – handy for basketball, cricket and netball later on.

Here are the kinds of things your child might do in PE:

  • Year 1 children race against each other and their own best time to move bean bags from one hoop to another in an efficient, coordinated and controlled way.
     
  • At the end of a games activity a teacher might ask her Year 2 class questions about how their bodies respond to exercise and why it might be important to them. They make a connection between exercise and their hearts beating faster, their lungs needing more air and feeling more energised afterwards

 

 

Help your child at home

 

  • Walk to and from school and whenever else you can.
     
  • Provide opportunity for active play with friends outside of school.
     
  • Encourage your child to take up a sport or structured exercise hobby.
     
  • Encourage moderately intensive activity for at least one hour every day (for example, four 15-minute periods) such as brisk walking, dance, games, swimming, cycling, or active play.
     
  • Encourage activities that enhance and maintain muscular strength, flexibility and bone health at least twice a week, such as climbing, skipping, jumping or gymnastics.
     
  • Teach your child to be aware of health risks, such as smoking, drinking and stress.
     
  • Daily, offer your child five fruit and vegetables in a variety of types and colours.

 

What does PE look like in Key Stage 2?

In Key Stage 2 physical and health education, gross and fine motor skills are further developed through a variety of team sports, games and activities. Effective team play highlights the sharing of responsibilities and goals amongst players and encourages meaningful group interaction. The aim is to provide opportunities for pupils to experience and learn the benefits of teamwork, cooperation and fair play needed to achieve a common goal.

In dance activities, children reflect on how to use movement to explore and communicate ideas and feelings. They learn to develop motor skills that will enable them to respond in a variety of ways. They will be encouraged through active participation, reflective observation and critical evaluation to develop these skills.

Lesson examples

Over the next few years, here are some of the kinds of activities your child might get involved in at school:

 

  • Year 3 pupils compose a dance. They work in pairs to first listen to some music and then to explore shapes, actions and patterns.
  • Year 4 pupils use floor and apparatus to demonstrate ways of travelling. They show skill and agility in ways of turning or rotating in their sequence and in having a clear starting and finishing position.
  • Using hockey sticks, a year 5 class concentrates on keeping tennis balls close to the stick while moving around the area. Some of the pupils progress to hitting the ball to other players, using the flat side of the stick only.
  • Some year 6 pupils working beyond the expectation for their year may show consistent precision, control and fluency in their skills. They demonstrate speed and pace, adapting techniques accurately and appropriately to the demands of the activity

 

 

Help your child at home

p your child at home

  • Walk to and from school and whenever else you can.
     
  • Provide opportunities for active play with your child’s friends outside of school.
     
  • Encourage them to take up of a sport or structured exercise hobby.
     
  • Encourage them to undertake moderately intensive activity for at least one hour every day (for example, four 15-minute periods) such as brisk walking, dance, games, swimming, cycling, active play or sport.
     
  • Help your child to choose activities that enhance and maintain muscular strength, flexibility and bone health at least twice a week, such as climbing, skipping, jumping or gymnastics.
     
  • Talk to your child about the importance of staying healthy and active, and about the dangers of smoking, drinking and stress.
     
  • Encourage a healthy diet daily of five fruit and vegetables in a variety of types and colours.
     
  • Join the British Heart Foundation's Artie Beat Club. Your child will get a quarterly newsletter, badge, Artie Beat 5-a-day chart, and opportunities to enter competitions and win prizes.

 

 

Progression of Skills

Year 6 Residential

At Rimrose Hope, we believe that learning is most effective when it's fun. Each year, our year 6 children endure an outdoor adventure activity experience that naturally has additional benefits which encourage the development of social and personal skills. All activities are visited offsite and the selection of challenging, high-adrenaline and fun activities are programmed to suit our children's requirements including: team building, resilience, self confidence and enjoyment. 

Year 6 Water Safety

KS2 Dance

Outdoor Education

Year 1/2CR Gynmastics Travelling, Jumping and Rolling

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Year 1/2 CR Gymnastics Group and Apparatus Work

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Year 1/2 Gymnastics

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Year 1/2 CR have been working this term with the Beth Tweedle Gymnastics Academy. This is part of their warm up each week.

P.E Curriculum Map 2017-2018

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